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Numsa Policy Resolutions

 

Edited Version

 

Section 2

 

Organising, Campaigns and Collective Bargaining

Resolutions

 

1987 to end June 2012

(includes NC 2012) 2012

 


Section 2

 

Organising, Campaigns and Collective Bargaining

Resolutions


 

Table of Contents

 

Believing. 6

Industrial Councils / Bargaining Councils. 6

Regional and national bargaining in workers’ interests. 6

Numsa Organising and Collective Bargaining Strategy and Policies. 6

Bargain at different levels. 6

Numsa Organising and Collective Bargaining Demands. 6

Skills Development 6

Organising. 6

Organisational Renewal 6

Trans National Corporations (TNCs) 7

Takeovers. 7

Numsa Sectors. 8

Engineering. 8

House Agreements. 8

Tyre and Rubber. 8

Plastics. 8

Jewellery. 8

Motor. 8

Organising Strategy. 8

Numsa Organising and Collective Bargaining Strategy and Policies. 10

Numsa Organising and Collective Bargaining Strategy. 10

The 3 year bargaining strategy. 10

Company level bargaining and the 3 year strategy. 10

Develop a Fighting Agenda. 10

Numsa’s new organising and collective bargaining strategy. 11

Strike Procedure. 11

Agency Shop. 11

Engineering Bargaining Process. 11

Collective Bargaining Training. 11

Numsa Organising and Collective Bargaining Demands. 12

Living Wage and Decent Jobs. 12

National Demands. 12

National Demands 1987/88. 12

National Demands 1993-1996: Three year bargaining strategy. 12

Right to Strike. 13

Recognition Agreements. 13

Procedure for Negotiating Recognition Agreements. 13

Collective Bargaining and Gender. 13

Retrenchment. 14

Short Time. 15

Skills Development. 15

Principles of skills development 15

Rights of Workers. 16

Problems in Skills Development 16

Improving Implementation. 16

Scarce skills. 16

RPL. 16

Adult Education. 16

Skills Development for Women. 16

Workplace Restructuring. 16

Productivity. 16

Competitiveness and new management techniques. 16

Workplace Forums. 16

Paid time for shop stewards training. 16

Company Relocation Allowance. 16

Retirement Benefits. 16

Pension and Provident Fund Guidelines. 16

Industrial Councils / Bargaining Councils. 16

Membership of Industrial Council 16

Bargaining Council Representation. 16

Bargaining Council Transformation. 16

Deregulation. 16

Organising and servicing members. 16

Organising Strategy. 16

Organise all workers. 16

Organise beyond the workplace. 16

Strategic Planning. 16

Develop fully fledged organizing department 16

Organisational Renewal for efficient member service. 16

Service Improvement Measures. 16

Recruitment. 16

Cross sector unity. 16

Organising targets. 16

Small and rural companies. 16

Supplier Parks. 16

White Collar Workers. 16

Numsa and Youth. 16

Health and Safety. 16

Building occupational Health and Safety Capability. 16

Health and Safety and technological change. 16

Worker power in Trans National Corporations. 16

Guidelines for foreign company takeovers. 16

Dealing with member Indebtedness. 16

Numsa Campaigns. 16

General campaign guidelines. 16

Pick up the Gains Campaign. 16

W. Cape Special Project. 16

Campaign on Executive Pay. 16

Labour Law Campaign. 16

Campaigns, Protests and Civil Society. 16

UDF. 16

MDM... 16

Ceasefire Campaign. 16

Service Delivery Protests. 16

Companies. 16

Eskom.. 16

Organising. 16

Privatisation. 16

Richards Bay Minerals. 16

Denel 16

Working Class and Trade Union Unity. 16

Working Class Unity. 16

Metalworkers’ Unity. 16

Workers Charter. 16

Numsa Affiliation. 16

Cosatu. 16

Index. 16

 


 

Believing

 

This section is drawn from all the ‘Believing’ sections of all the Organising and Collective Bargaining resolutions from 1987 to 2011.

 

Industrial Councils / Bargaining Councils

 

Regional and national bargaining in workers’ interests

1.     Using the industrial councils to achieve regional and national conditions of employment will be in the interests of all metal workers.

 

Numsa Organising and Collective Bargaining Strategy and Policies

 

Bargain at different levels

1.  Regional and national bargaining must be complimented by plant level negotiations where workers so decide.

 

Numsa Organising and Collective Bargaining Demands

 

Skills Development

1.     A more highly skilled working class is needed to lay the base for a democratically planned socialist economy.

2.     Skills will be needed if the working class is to gain and maintain control of production.

 

Organising

 

Organisational Renewal

1.     THE PRINCIPLE IS:  Improving service delivery, building shopfloor organisation, building structures based on the needs of the region.

2.     That the current renewal programme is aimed at improving service to members.

3.     That the organisational renewal programme on its own wont solve the problem.

4.     Numsa's current systems of resourcing for organisers and shop stewards working in remote areas are not enough.

5.     Through the re-focusing of our organizing and collective bargaining department at local regional and national level we can be able to set up collectively a team of cadres capable of transforming the organizational vision of confronting logic of capital

 


 

Trans National Corporations (TNCs)

1.     Capital is engaged in a global war against workers, trade unions and the poor.

2.     That the power of organized workers is crucial in challenging the power of TNCs.

3.     That there is a need to build a strong movement of workers at international level to counteract the power of capital.

4.     That there is need to change the orientation of global trade unions in their approach towards TNCs.

5.     That the global class war against workers will not be destroyed through lobbying, press statements and negotiations only. There is a need to urgently respond through workers’ direct action.

6.     That government will only regulate TNCs because of pressure from organized workers and the poor.

7.     Social movements, NGOs and communities could play a major role in alliance with trade unions to pressurize TNCs.

8.     That the buy-in by workers into TNCs and country’s competition has undermined workers’ solidarity and allows the TNCs a free rein.

 

Takeovers

1.     That there is a need for the union to protect its members during take-overs by local and foreign companies.

2.     That changes brought by these companies are not friendly to workers’ interests.

 

 

 


 

 

Numsa Sectors

 

From here onwards all the text is drawn from the ‘Resolving’ sections of resolutions.

 

Engineering

 

House Agreements

1.     Audit House Agreements to see what has and hasn’t been achieved.

2.     Capacitate those dealing with the sector

3.     Explore a separate chamber for House Agreements in terms of the Mega Bargaining Council idea

4.     Ensure that House Agreement workers do not lose any benefits with the new configuration[1]

 

Tyre and Rubber

1.     Rubber workers should not be transferred to the Chemical Workers Industrial Union[2].

 

Plastics

1.     No Numsa members in plastic plants would be forced to resign from the union[3].

 

Jewellery

1.     No further recruitment should take place in this industry; the existing members should be retained and the union's scope of registration shall not be extended to include this industry[4] .

 

Motor

 

Organising Strategy

1.     Urban Areas

1.1.  At least one shop steward will be elected at each organised establishment; these shop stewards at establishments in a street, constitute a street committee.

1.2.  One shop steward from each street committee in an area constitute an area committee.

1.3.  The Constitution will be amended to allow for shop stewards in small workshops employing less than 50 workers. All area committees attend meetings of the local shop steward councils on the same basis as factory shop steward committees.

2.     Rural Areas

2.1.  At least one shop steward will be elected at each organised establishment; these shop stewards at establishments in a town constitute a town committee.

2.2.  Three shop stewards from each town committee in a group of towns, form an area committee.

3.     General meetings

3.1.  To improve participation and attendance at meetings, general meetings in both urban and rural areas should be held at least once a quarter.

4.     Dissemination of information

4.1.  A "motor newsletter" should be distributed once a quarter, containing news specific to the motor sector. In the urban areas the newsletter should be distributed by the shop stewards; in the rural areas it should be posted to the members’ places of work.

4.2.  These newsletters should be in the different languages eg. English, Xhosa, Zulu, Sotho and Afrikaans.

5.     Representation

5.1.  In order to prevent organisers from spending their time handling grievances and individual dismissals at small establishments, the shop stewards will represent workers on any grievances they may have and will liaise with the organiser concerned where difficulties arise.

5.2.  In the rural areas, each town committee will have a recorder who will be the person to liaise with the organiser concerned where difficulties arise.

6.     Resources

6.1.  An organiser mainly responsible for motor sector membership must be identified in such local as determined by the regions in order to improve the servicing of the motor sector membership.

6.2.  There must also be an organiser responsible for the coordination of activities in relation to the motor sector membership[5].

 

 


 

Numsa Organising and Collective Bargaining Strategy and Policies

 

Numsa Organising and Collective Bargaining Strategy

 

The 3 year bargaining strategy

1.     The strategy aims to negotiate a framework for the modernisation of our industries. Many businesses want to restructure by cutting wages and retrenching: we want to restructure by increasing skills, creating clear career paths, reorganising. Our 3 year strategy for bargaining aims to put us clearly on the road to restructuring along Numsa's path.

2.     Of course the actual restructuring must take place at the plant and company level. So as we put the framework in place, we will have to negotiate how to implement the restructuring at company level but in terms of our national negotiated framework[6].

 

Company level bargaining and the 3 year strategy

1.     All company level bargaining must comply with the 3 year bargaining strategy within the following guidelines:

1.1.  No organiser is allowed to submit demands unless these have been cleared by the Regional Team.

1.2.  As far as possible we must avoid new company level bargaining: we should only submit demands to companies where we already have company bargaining.

1.3.  Our demands should be:

1.3.1.   Over 3 years the company must bring the lowest wage in the plant to be at least 60% of the highest wage

1.3.2.    Over 3 years, the company must agree to increase wages on average by at least the Cost of Living plus 15%; we aim for Cost of Living +5% for 1993.

1.3.3.   The company must reduce the number of grades to 5 in the way put forward in the Numsa national proposal

1.3.4.   The company must bring benefits and working conditions into line with Numsa's national demands.

1.3.5.   All agreements on wages and conditions must expire on 30 June.

1.3.6.   Clerical and non-scheduled workers must be included in the grading system and the negotiations.

1.3.7.   There must be no jobs lost because of increases of productivity in the company[7].

 

Develop a Fighting Agenda

1.     The first central committee after the national congress to develop a fighting agenda for our organizing and collective bargaining department at national level which should cascade to regions and locals.

2.     The fighting agenda to be developed should include a clear vision of the union on wages, training issues, health and safety issues, economic challenges, global challenges related to WTO negotiations and challenges arising from government’s multilateral trade agreements signed with other countries.

3.     To popularize the fighting agenda and ensure that it is developed through the regions, regions should immediately hold regional shop stewards councils followed by local rallies or local general meetings[8]

 

Numsa’s new organising and collective bargaining strategy

1.     The organising, campaigns and collective bargaining strategy, as presented to the 2012 National Congress,  was adopted. The implementation framework must be developed[9].

 

Strike Procedure

1.     All strikes must be discussed with the local organiser and local shop stewards council BEFORE they take place. The Regional Secretary must be informed immediately of all strikes.

2.     The Regional Secretary must notify the Collective Bargaining Secretary of all strikes so that they can be reported to the NOCC.

3.     Every region must send a report on strikes over the past 6 months to the Collective Bargaining Secretary.

4.     Subject to the decision of the REC, the Union will not be party to selective reemployment agreements[10].

 

Agency Shop

1.     The agency fee must be utilised only for collective bargaining purposes and nothing else at all[11]; records must be kept at all times[12] 

2.     We must develop a clear programme on how to use agency shop and closed shop[13]

 

Engineering Bargaining Process

1.     The practice of having the local shop steward council chairpersons attend a caucus in a local near the venue of the main NICISEMI negotiations would be continued. No lost wages would be paid for attendance at these caucuses[14].

 

Collective Bargaining Training

1.     We must greatly increase education and training on our New Collective Bargaining Strategy which involves industry restructuring. This requires detailed knowledge of each sector and industry. This must involve:

1.1.  The training of shop stewards to negotiate around these new issues. This training must be in addition to the existing education programme.

1.2.  The training of organisers and worker leaders to be experts in specific sectors and or industries[15].


 

Numsa Organising and Collective Bargaining Demands

 

Living Wage and Decent Jobs

1.     We commit ourselves to struggle for a living wage in all sectors of the industry as soon as possible[16].

2.     In our fight for a living wage we must place at the centre of our demands the implementation of a well researched poverty datum line as our bottom line to improve our standard of living[17].

3.     Numsa fully supports the Living Wage Campaign adopted by the June 2011 Cosatu Central Committee.  The introduction of the tollgates in Gauteng must be incorporated into the Cosatu Living Wage Campaign so that we campaign against this imposition of an additional tax burden on the working class.  The August 2011 Cosatu CEC must adopt a clear programme so as to lead the affiliates in the struggle for a living wage[18].

4.     Cosatu must spearhead the intensification of the fight for a living wage in South Africa. Such a fight must necessarily involve integrating collective bargaining demands with the real cost of reproducing a worker in South Africa and the struggle to abolish the Apartheid wage gap.[19]

 

National Demands

 

National Demands 1987/88

1.     The union must build a campaign around a set of national demands; the campaign must be developed from the membership in the factories and locals.

2.     The national demands are:

2.1.  guaranteed annual income

2.2.  living wage of R4,50 per hour

2.3.  40 hour week without loss of pay

2.4.  March 21, May 1, June 16 as national paid holidays

2.5.  retrenchment pay of one month's salary for every year of employment

2.6.  6 months paid maternity leave and 14 days paternity leave

2.7.  equal and increased technical and vocational training for females and youth.

3.     All industrial departments should actively implement these demands and report annually on progress made in all industrial sectors.

 

National Demands 1993-1996: Three year bargaining strategy

1.     Reduce the number of grades

2.     Link the grades to skill levels not tasks

3.     Negotiate training:

3.1.  A framework of how workers can climb the ladder

3.2.  The right to assessment and upgrading according to skill

4.     Negotiate wage increases:

4.1.  Inflation plus 15%

4.2.  Bottom grade to earn at least 60% of the artisan’s wage

5.     Work organisation changes to be negotiated and agreed at plant level[20].

Right to Strike

1.     Campaign and respond vigorously against police and state intervention in strikes and industrial disputes.

2.     Fight for the removal of the designation of essential services and that all workers be allowed to share equal rights.

3.     Fight for the right of all workers to strike without dismissal.

4.     Fight for the right of workers to picket freely[21].

 

Recognition Agreements

 

Procedure for Negotiating Recognition Agreements

1.     Before a recognition agreement is discussed, the company must extend the following basic rights to Numsa

1.1.  stop orders

1.2.  access for organisers to the factory

1.3.  shop steward recognition

1.4.  general meetings in the factory

2.     After granting basic rights but before negotiations start, the company must agree the following principles:

2.1.  right to strike without dismissal

2.2.  company support for centralised collective bargaining

2.3.  paid leave for shop stewards

2.4.  sole collective bargaining rights for Numsa once the union has proved 51% membership.

3.     If a company agrees to these principles, the regional secretary must be informed in writing. The Regional Secretary in consultation with the Collective Bargaining Secretary will give written approval to start the Recognition Agreement negotiations. The Regional Secretary may refuse to continue the negotiations. An organiser or the shop stewards concerned can approach the REC through their local to discuss such a refusal to continue negotiations. All agreements must be signed by the Regional Secretary[22].

 

Collective Bargaining and Gender

1.     Fight against:

1.1.  all unequal and discriminatory treatment of women at work, in society and in the union.

1.2.  sexual harassment in whatever form it occurs.

1.3.  Nightwork for pregnant women

2.     Fight for:

2.1.  the equal right of women and men to paid work as an important part of the broader aim to achieve full and freely chosen employment.

2.2.    equal pay for all work of equal value - the value of work must be determined by organised women and men workers themselves.

2.3.    Equal facilities for men and women

2.4.    Recognition and pay for women's skills

2.5.    the restructuring of employment to allow women and men the opportunity of qualifying for jobs of equal value.

2.6.    training opportunities in non-traditional areas of skilled work, with full parental and childcare rights for all trainees

2.7.    childcare and family facilities to meet workers' needs and make it easier for workers to combine work and family responsibilities.

2.8.    full maternity rights, including paid maternity and paternity leave and job security:

2.8.1.     Maternity leave of 6 months at full pay,

2.8.2.     Paternity leave of 16 days,

2.8.3.     Childcare leave of 20 days,

2.9.    the protection of women and men from all types of work proved to be harmful to them, including work which interferes with their ability to have children.

2.10. adequate and safe transport for workers doing overtime and night work

2.11. an affirmative action programme with employers that will ensure:

2.11.1.  That there are adult basic education classes and the necessary infrastructure both in the workplace and in the communities to benefit the entire working class and particularly disadvantaged sectors such as, women, unemployed and the marginalised youth.

2.11.2.  That there is employment equity.

2.11.3.  That more women are trained in specialised fields including apprenticeship in order to combat gender ghettoisation.

2.11.4.  That unfair taxation of women is ended.

3.     Bargaining teams provide regular report backs and be educated on gender politics[23].

4.     Numsa must employ a full-time gender co-ordinator to ensure that these programmes relating to collective bargaining are seriously taken up by all sectors in the union whilst women should be included in the respective bargaining teams.

 

Retrenchment

1.     The Union's overall approach is to fight for security of employment through macro-economic policies that increase employment in the economy, industrial policies that expand and restructure the industry and labour market policies that raise skill levels, retrain workers, provide a career path for all workers and bring about a general rise in productivity.

2.     Retrenchment is therefore an action of last resort and if it is to take place it should be in terms of the following guidelines:

2.1.  Alternatives to retrenchment - on the basis of a careful analysis of the situation we must seek alternatives to retrenchment once the company has informed us of proposed retrenchments. This is an important step and demands here must be fought for. Only if this fails should we revert to steps 2.2 - 2.4 below.

2.2.  Selection Criteria - LIFO remains the most practical and fair procedure. Exceptions to this must be applied in very limited circumstances.

2.3.  Severance Pay - there must be severance pay in the case of retrenchment and it must be greater the longer the service of the retrenched worker.

2.4.  Assistance to retrenched workers - the Company must make every effort to find employment elsewhere and ensure all documentation, benefits and other matters are complete and finalised.

2.5.  there must be clauses dealing with the rehiring of retrenched workers, provided that no worker should be excluded on the basis of a health condition that existed at the time of retrenchment.

2.6.  there should be no limit to the length of service when calculating severance pay.

3.     Employers should not undermine EEA when selecting workers for retrenchment or when recalling workers or retrenchees for re-employment[24].

4.     We must shift our over reliance on the S198 provisions and develop a fighting campaign which must launch an offensive on employers who hide behind the global financial crisis BUT who continues to maximize profits[25].

5.     The union must continue fighting against retrenchments instead of rushing to engage on the selection criteria.[26]

 

Short Time

1.     Companies to contribute when workers are on short-time to the relevant benefits such as pension/provident fund, UIF and Medical Aid[27].

2.     Short time must only be allowed after intensive interrogation and provision of substantive reasons.

3.     In all Numsa sectors, Numsa must review all clauses in the agreement that are less favourable than the BCEA; they should be replaced with at least the provisions of the BCEA.

4.     All Numsa organised companies must comply with training during short time

5.     All industries must be in line with 5 working days’ notice for short time.[28]

 

 

Skills Development

 

Principles of skills development

1.     Formal education must be free and compulsory; there must be clear links between the formal schooling system, the adult education system, the industrial training system and other education and training systems eg. for the youth and unemployed.

2.     Employers and the State have a duty to train; both have a role to play in financing such training.

3.     Training must be linked to economic planning.

4.     Trade Unions must play a central role in planning, implementing and monitoring training.  There must be agreed procedures for selection and testing.

5.     Trade Unions must fight to end the effects of past class, race and sex discrimination in training.

6.     Training must be based on short courses that allow workers to progress from one course to the next.  The courses must lead to national or industrial certificates.

7.     Training must be linked to grading, and hence to pay. An increase in skill must lead to an increase in pay. The grading system must allow workers to advance up a career path from the lowest to the highest level through training.

8.     There must be career paths for trainers.  Training trainers must be a central part of the system.

 

Rights of Workers

1.     All workers should:

1.1.  Enjoy access to paid training:

1.1.1.     be allowed to do 2 modules per year from the Industry's education and training system

1.1.2.     200 hours of training should be guaranteed but not limited for all workers.

1.2.  Have a right to assessment to see what skills they have and pay for the skills they possess, even if they are greater than the job they are doing; if their skills are less than the job they are doing, then they should be allowed to upgrade their skills. There must be recognition and pay for skills that workers already have

1.3.  Receive training during working hours. If after working hours, it must be paid.

1.4.  Have paid education and training leave. 

1.5.  Have access to retraining, if they are facing retrenchment or experiencing unemployment, as a stepping stone to secure employment.

1.6.  Enjoy access to education and training throughout life to ensure that skills keep pace with technological change, are needed by society and enable the person to develop his or her abilities.

 

Problems in Skills Development

1.     In spite of the high rate of unemployment in our country, there is a shortage of skilled operators and artisans in our industries. Government and the private sector have not been able to provide adequate skills training to workers who are in need of such skills.

2.     Furthermore, there continues to be a situation where workers on the shopfloor are given irrelevant and incomplete training which centres purely on their current job while management spends most of the training budget on expensive courses that have no contribution to the increased productivity of the company.

 

Improving Implementation

1.     Companies should implement the procedures laid down in the Skills Development Act.

2.     All skills and training should be linked to grading and South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA).

3.     Quotas for skills and training to companies should be implemented on a yearly basis. 

4.     The skills levy by companies to the Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Seta (MERSETA) must increase from the current 1% to 3-4%.

5.     The Skills Development Act (SDA) must be amended to give it more teeth.  The Act must enable the Department of Labour to send inspectors to companies not paying the levy and those that are paying, but are not claiming the grants. The inspectors should also visit the plants to verify whether companies are training their workers

6.     Where companies are not implementing, the Skills Development Levies Act should be amended to allow for fines, jail sentences or other penalties to be imposed.  

7.     Companies who make use of labour brokers and contract labour services must be responsible for providing skills training and development to workers provided by such brokers and contractors;

8.     The Department of Labour must increase its human resources in order to adequately enforce or monitor the implementation of the Employment Equity Act (EEA).

9.     Numsa must lobby and work towards a national training entity that would ensure that there are training initiatives for retrenched workers in all provinces.

10.  That entity must monitor, evaluate and moderate training so that there is a qualitative outcome for skills training of workers and not just any kind of training. We must ensure a more accountable way of monitoring what kind of training is happening in regions.

 

Scarce skills

1.     OCCB must develop an engagement strategy with the Bargaining Councils and relevant SETAs on Scarce Skills; this should involve Department of Higher Education, MEIBC and the SETAs in which Numsa is represented. The justification for the employment of foreign skills is that they cannot be found in the country, but there appears to be no database in the country and it is not certain whether this is a true reflection of the scarce skills in the country.

 

RPL

1.     The process must be jointly administered by management and the union. Both parties must be trained as RPL assessors.

2.     RPL should be compulsory for employers but voluntary for employees.

3.     No employee must be down-graded as a result of RPL.

4.     Assessment methods should be flexible and include: interviews, demonstrations, written tests and portfolios.

5.     All skills acquired must be paid for, even if they are not being used or applied.

 

Adult Education

1.     An adult education system should be nationally negotiated and be recognised by both management and the State.  The system should be negotiated by Cosatu, rather than individual affiliates where practical, in order to ensure that the courses are recognised across all industries.

2.     Courses must be recognised as providing sufficient education for entry into training courses.  The course must also be recognised nationally as equal to formal education standards.

3.     All courses, including literacy and numeracy must be developed to allow clear steps to advance from one course to the next.  The courses must lead to nationally recognised certificates.

4.     There must be paid time off for literacy and numeracy courses.

5.     Employers must provide facilities for literacy classes and negotiate with Unions both the paying and training of literacy and numeracy teachers as well as the development of suitable materials.

 

Skills Development for Women

1.     Through collective bargaining, Numsa should demand industry training for women to ensure that by 2003, a significant % of women occupy male-dominated jobs.

2.     Education and training in companies should prioritise and target women.[29].

 

Workplace Restructuring

1.     Any changes to work organisation must be negotiated and agreed at plant level using the following guidelines:

1.1.  if employers save costs because of a change to work organisation, awards must be given to all employees not just individuals

1.2.  employers must give information and discuss their strategic plans with unions

1.3.  work organisation changes must empower workers

1.4.  we must fight for employment security, job creation and resist lowering of manning levels through natural attrition

1.5.  for work teams:

1.5.1. the union triggers the teams

1.5.2. work teams have a real say over targets, line speeds etc.

1.5.3. team leaders are democratically elected and rotated

1.5.4. team leaders can’t take disciplinary action; this to remain with management

1.5.5. the union can take up production issues

1.5.6. the union can meet with its own members outside of the team

1.5.7. participation in teams is voluntary

1.5.8. shop stewards can address team meetings and union-related issues can be discussed in green areas/team centres

1.5.9. the team does not have to meet its target if one of its members is absent

1.6.  A company must give 6 months notice of the introduction of new technology. This notice period must be before the decision to purchase the machinery has taken place.

 

Productivity

1.     All productivity payments must be separate from the base rate.

2.     All productivity gains must be shared equally. When dividing this equally, comrades at plant level can consider tax implications.

3.     Productivity must be a matter for negotiation, not consultation[30]

 

Competitiveness and new management techniques

1.     We need to be productive, but as a union we reject the ideology and proposals for competitiveness.

2.     We will oppose any attempt to make us compete against our fellow workers.

3.     We should reject the new management and production techniques, as they do not lead to genuine worker participation and democratisation of the workplace.

4.     Instead of focusing on making different companies competitive, as a union we should devise industrial policies that will lead to:

4.1.  the development of our productive capacities

4.2.  OB creation[31]

 


 

Workplace Forums

1.     Guidelines for the union’s response on Work Place Forums are that:

1.1.  No shopsteward or organiser triggers a workplace forum or participates in one without the prior approval of the General Secretary.

1.2.  That where the union is forced to respond to the setting up of a workplace forum, permission may be granted by the National Office Bearers under the following conditions:

1.2.1.     the forum is constituted on a union basis i.e. non unionised individuals would be excluded

1.2.2.     union representatives on the forum operate on a proper mandate from the union structures

1.2.3.     shopstewards participating in the forum are granted a minimum of 20 days paid training leave for union-organised training. The company pays the costs of the training which will include tuition, accommodation and transport.

1.2.4.     The company agrees to give the union open access to information and will pay all costs relating to the Union’s participation in the workplace forum, including education and training and the union’s costs in hiring independent researchers to process the information.

1.2.5.     The union can withdraw from a workplace forum at any point that it chooses[32].

1.3.  Disciplinary action should be taken on those who trigger workplace forums.

1.4.  A specialized committee of three people will be formed  to be trained so that the Union can respond equally on the above issues. That committee will be thoroughly trained in this field.  The committee will be used as a nucleus to trouble-shoot and assist in these processes.  The work of the committee will be incorporated into education and training departments

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

Paid time for shop stewards training

1.     Numsa and Cosatu to develop a campaign for shop stewards to receive paid time-off to attend training and education provided by the union and associated organisations. This must particularly apply to the New Collective Bargaining Strategy[33].

 

Company Relocation Allowance

1.     Reasonable travelling allowances and other relevant assistance to be provided by the employer to all workers affected by the relocation of a company[34]


 

Retirement Benefits

 

Pension and Provident Fund Guidelines

1.     Convert existing pension schemes to Provident Schemes subject to the approval of the relevant Regional Executive Committees as well as the Central Committee of the union, who shall ensure that wherever possible small schemes are merged into larger ones so as to rationalise the number of schemes in which Numsa has membership.

2.     Strive for maximum control over provident fund schemes to facilitate members' access to their withdrawal benefits for housing purposes and to invest the assets of such schemes in socially useful projects, (particularly land, housing and shelter) which will not unduly prejudice the members of such schemes[35].

3.     Demand of the state that current pension benefits be increased and that racial discrimination in pension benefits be totally abolished.

4.     The model provident scheme aims to achieve the following:

4.1.  retirement age of 55

4.2.  refund of all contributions (employer + interest + surplus) for dismissal, resignation or retrenchment (from year 1)

4.3.  5 x annual salary for death or disability

4.4.  R2000.00 funeral benefit; 0 - 6 years a funeral benefit of R1 500

4.5.  employer to carry all insured benefit and administration expenses and not less than 66% of total contributions for retirement benefits

4.6.  union representation on Board of Trustees

4.7.  administrators on contract basis and paid fee for specific services (not flat percentage)

4.8.  members should be provided with an annual statement of all contributions made to their credit

5.     Industry and company p/p schemes should be seen as supplementary saving schemes - they should not replace the state pension schemes.

6.     Private p/p schemes should not where possible be used for loans for housing for individual members. Instead the company should provide (small) loans (and collateral) from its own resources. For larger loans, despite their problems, the RDG recommends the use of building societies like the Nedperm over and above other options like credit unions, terminating building societies etc[36].

 

 


 

Industrial Councils / Bargaining Councils

 

Membership of Industrial Council

1.     The Union should apply and become a party to the industrial councils having jurisdiction in the areas and industrial sections where our members are employed.

2.     Membership of the industrial councils shall not prevent the union and its members from participating in plant level negotiations[37].

 

Bargaining Council Representation

1.     We should develop a clear deployment and restructuring strategy for the council to maintain our hegemony.

2.     Numsa should increase the threshold for registration in the MEIBC to 15 000 per union by 2007[38].

 

Bargaining Council Transformation

1.     We regard the bargaining council as an institution that should be structured and perfected so that metalworkers enjoy an effective service from the council, better benefits, and maximum protection against unscrupulous employers from underpayment and contraventions. Head Office and regions (through the REC’s) must contribute towards ensuring that we transform the councils and so that the dispute resolution centre serves the interests of workers first and foremost.

2.     A program of restructuring the bargaining councils as per the founding resolution must be implemented. This program must be headed by a president and the organization will use its majority to transform the councils to reflect the majority within these institutions. This will include deploying our own cadres into key areas including as inspectors[39].

3.     We should reconstitute the interviewing panels in the bargaining councils to influence appointments so that employment in bargaining is transformed;

4.     Dispute resolution must be re-shaped so that it takes into account the following;

4.1.  Influencing the appointment of Commissioners and monitoring the performance of Commissioners and acting against their sometimes biased posture and decisions

4.2.  In-sourcing of dispute resolution in MEIBC away from Tokiso

5.     We should undertake a constitutional review to place control of bargaining councils in the hands of those who contribute to the financial existence of the council. This should amongst others include the following;

5.1.  Powers of the CEO

5.2.  Powers of Regional Managers viz a viz Regional Chairpersons of the MEIBC

6.     The elections of office bearers in bargaining councils and other external formations must be the subject of constitutional structure approval

7.     Proper prior preparation before bargaining council or other external formation AGM’s must take place in NSSC’s and/or constitutional structures where such are convened before AGM’s

8.     There must be better management of exemptions

9.     There must be training of bargaining council reps and organisers on the Main Agreements alongside agents, as well as the training of bargaining council reps on reading financial statements.

10.  Bargaining Council reports must be a standing items on the agenda of REC’s and NEC’s

10.1.   Regional organising and campaigns committees must be revived to deal with council matters

10.2.   Councils must be requested to include our Regional Secretaries in their mailing lists and distribution of council reports

11.  Numsa must reflect on the selection of the labour rep in the Independent Exemptions Appeal Board. The labour nominees should submit regular reports and analyses.

12.  We must deal with how agents manage contraventions and underpayments as well as their general performance and capability.

 

Deregulation

1.     We commit ourselves to fight all attempts at deregulation and exemptions which allow employers outside the main centres to pay slave rates and to give no benefits at all to workers[40].

2.     We strongly oppose any deregulation of small businesses or their exclusion from industrial council agreements:

2.1.  We oppose any exemptions from industrial council wages and conditions of employment for firms in rural areas, unless the workers in those firms freely and democratically, without any pressure being placed on them, support the request for exemption.

3.     We accept that the only way to stop deregulation is to organize these businesses; the secretariat must develop ways of doing this[41].

 

 


 

Organising and servicing members

 

Organising Strategy

1.     We should launch a campaign for organisational renewal. The aims of this campaign will be to:

1.1.  build capacity at all levels of the organisation

1.2.  strengthen our ability to implement resolutions

1.3.  make the organisation financially stronger so that no programmes are abandoned because of lack of funds.

2.     As a union we must ensure that a dynamic relationship exists with our members. Ways of ensuring this relationship may involve the following:

2.1.  make this year’s Ear to the Ground campaign an annual event - to take place at the beginning of each year.

2.2.  ensure that the leadership regularly consults with grassroots membership.

2.3.  develop clear policies that will be understood by ordinary workers.

3.     For the purposes of organizing and campaigns, we should establish zonal/area shop steward councils[42]

 

Organise all workers

1.     Numsa must produce a strategy on how to tackle the question of mobilizing and uniting all workers irrespective of their racial backgrounds, and how to recruit them into Numsa.

1.1.  We must focus on the shopfloor - on the unity of the working class, with special focus on white and coloured workers. We must go all out to organise white workers so that we give expression to our class duty to bring about unity of the South African working.[43]

2.     Beyond the shopfloor Numsa should set up structures primarily in Indian/Coloured designated areas to deal with the legacy of the Group Areas Act.  Through organisational structures, we should audit our members/shop stewards and pull together periodic political sessions.

3.     We will resist and campaign against employers’ tendency to fragment work along racial lines.

4.     We must fast track and design campaigns around equity and affirmative action in the recruitment and employment of managers of all ranks. Currently, industry management positions continue to be dominated by white conservative males

 

Organise beyond the workplace

1.     We must integrate our activists within community based structures/struggle to stimulate consciousness.

2.     The politics of unionism should be linked programmatically with youth organisations at all levels especially tertiary[44].

 


 

Strategic Planning

1.     The 4 year Master Strategic Plan will serve as our guiding policy in our endeavour to build a strong and effective union.

2.     The ultimate aim of strategic planning should be to sharpen our ideological skills and enhance the capacity of leadership to provide effective and democratic management of the organisation[45].

 

Develop fully fledged organizing department

1.     Numsa must develop a fully fledged organizing department headed by a president to deal with its core business of recruitment and representation of members against any form of exploitation by the bosses.[46]

 

Organisational Renewal for efficient member service

1.     Efficient servicing of members remains our biggest task, and that the OR sub pilot on “Strengthening Locals” should continue to be tried and tested and monitored.

2.     Numsa should commission a large study on the state of service to members. On the basis of the study, it should develop guidelines and bench-mark, develop systems to enable regions to gain experience through the organisational renewal programme process. Numsa should review current systems of resources to organisers and shop stewards in remote areas and where possible increase current allocation to effect proper service to members

3.     The CC must implement the restructuring of locals across all regions and to continue evaluation of the pilot and make necessary amendments to effect better service to the membership.

4.     If a region wants to do a pilot, then they must:

4.1.  Complete the national questionnaire to experiment with what kind of pilot would work for the respective region.

4.2.  Engage in a process of proper prior consultations with leadership and staff in the region and develop clear guidelines/program to get all “on board”: from members, to Shop stewards, to Staff and Lob’s and Rob’s.

4.3.  Clearly define the roles of each Staff including the RS, Lob’s and Rob’s

4.4.  Clearly allocate specialisation/ new work areas

4.5.  Submit regular reports on agreed dates

4.6.  Hold regular meetings to monitor the process and to share experiences

4.7.  Put in place training and resources well before the pilot commences.

5.     National and regional assessment meetings must be held quarterly to share experiences.

6.     The regional secretary must have the authority to make urgent changes within the agreed OR framework.

7.     Regional secretaries and regional organisers should lead the OR programmes.

8.     Training must be given to all staff and office bearers on how to manage the OR process[47].

9.     The OR project must be subordinated to the organising, campaigns and collective bargaining strategy and not contradict the strategy.

10.  Local organisers must return to locals as has happened in most regions as part of bringing service closer to members and as part of channelling resources more to locals where it matters most.[48]

Service Improvement Measures

1.     The CC must commission a large scale study on the state of service delivery to the membership and on the basis of such a report, the July CC will develop guidelines on how best to improve service to our members.

2.     A follow up survey must be done with shop stewards on the attitude of members to their organization[49]

3.     Numsa must explore extending its scope as far as representation is concerned i.e. have a department that assists workers with criminal matters, insurance and civil claims, so that members do not resort to Legal Wise or Scorpions.

4.     Numsa must find a solution to the dissatisfaction of our members in the Western Cape in particular and across all regions in general as far as service is concerned in order to provide a better service that satisfies them.

5.     Numsa must institutionalise the survey to be conducted in between national congresses and present the recommendations to the national congress for consideration as it has been done in terms of the 8th national congress.

6.     Numsa must call a shop steward indaba at national, regional and local level to deal with the following issues:

6.1.  Communication i.e. laptops, cell phones and how these will improve service to members

6.2.  Divisions amongst shop stewards

6.3.  The campaign around time off

6.4.  Lack of members’trust in shop stewards

6.5.  Lack of co-operation by members in attending meetings called by the shop stewards

6.6.  Lack of training on how to do their job including lack of support on complex legal matters and lack of support from the organizers.

7.     We support the establishment of a help line facility for difficult cases encountered by shop stewards at the region and head office. 

 

Recruitment

1.     We must organise the unorganised

1.1.  In companies where we have full-time shop-stewards, they must be used to organise the un-organised workers (organising forms part of a day to day function of staff and the above does not replace this)

2.     We must look at how to recruit more white collar workers

3.     We must have our own recruitment Campaign (Autumn Harvest) in Numsa to increase the membership and to make sure that all the companies are 100% organised,

4.     Shopstewards should be given a time-frame of approximately four months to recruit workers in their companies as a starting point whilst a month should be set aside for organisers to embark on a recruitment drive.

5.     As recruitment is an ongoing process, resources should be made available in the form of full-time shop stewards, local and regional office bearers, staff and campaigns committee. We should furthermore put in place a record of new members where servicing needs prioritising[50].

5.1.  It is time to take the issue of recruitment very seriously; the CC must consider the option of having comrades dedicated to recruitment work as happens in SACTWU[51]. The conditions for unemployed former Numsa members (volunteers) should be as follows:The stipend to increase from R100 to R150 per day of work (recruitment).

5.2.  Lunch and transport for volunteers to be catered for at R30 and R40 daily and respectively.

5.3.  Each local may have a maximum of 5 volunteers per local (reduced from 10 for resource reasons).[52]

 

Cross sector unity

1.     We must improve the servicing of membership across all sectors, especially the motor sector as the agreed national special project.

2.     We must set aside financial and human resources to give effect to this resolution.

3.     Numsa must develop a programme at local and regional levels which unifies the sectors. This programme should include:

3.1.  Bringing back the culture of frank and robust debate within the union.

3.2.  Setting up campaigns that cut across sectors, e.g.

3.2.1.     Retrenchments

3.2.2.     Agency Shop

3.2.3.     Insolvency Act.

3.3.  Encouraging joint local and regional shop stewards councils

3.4.  Ensuring the same dates or weeks of negotiations for all sectors in order to have same day reporting back meetings.

3.5.  Aiming for the same expiry dates of sector agreements.

3.6.  Establishing area committees.

4.     To maintain unity amongst workers, we must encourage worker to worker contact[53].

 

Organising targets

 

Small and rural companies

1.     Numsa accepts that the only way to stop deregulation is to organize these businesses; the secretariat must develop ways of doing this[54].

 

Supplier Parks

1.     The unions should build strong organizations in supplier parks to counteract the miserable conditions.

2.     Numsa should build strong bonds of solidarity by forming forums between members in supplier parks and main companies through campaigns and joint actions.

3.     Actions should be jointly undertaken to ensure main companies do not dump their bad dirty jobs and low paying jobs into supplier parks.

4.     Special shop stewards’ councils should be held in supplier parks on a bi-monthly basis.

5.     Guidelines should be drafted by the union to negotiate better conditions in supplier parks.

6.     Government subsidies to supplier parks should be monitored for cost to taxpayers, training and equity.  Numsa should use quantitative and qualitative measurements[55].

 

White Collar Workers

1.     We should have a ceiling on subscriptions for white-collar workers[56].

2.     We should not stop recruiting white collar workers even if they are managers who are victimizing our members[57]

 

Numsa and Youth

1.     Numsa should invite Progressive Youth Formations (the YCL, COSAS, SASCO and the ANCYL) into its political education programmes in order to share political development capacities.

2.     Numsa must speed up the process of establishing a youth desk, and further improve contact with youth in institutions of learning in order to conscientise and prepare them about the importance of unionisation in the labour market. The Central Committee must develop a programme to achieve a success in implementing these resolutions within twelve months[58].

 

Health and Safety

 

Building occupational Health and Safety Capability

1.     We should undertake a pilot project in Mpumalanga Numsa Region to deal with OHS related matters at regional level;

2.     We approve a fix term contract appointment of a Regional OHS Coordinator for a period up to/before the 9th National Congress in 2012. A clear job description should be developed.

3.     The National Congress should receive a status report of the pilot project so that Congress may consider the feasibility of a further roll out of dedicated OHS work at regional level;

4.     The National Secretariat with the National OHS Coordinator should engage both IHRG (UCT) and the OHS project at the UKZN to look at capacity building of OHS shopstewards and Organisers

5.     We should pursue the demand for Fulltime OHS Shopstewards so that OHS is taken very seriously in Numsa organised sectors in the South African economy[59]

 

Health and Safety and technological change

1.     If there are any technological changes at a company, the company should make sure that they also comply with the OHSA.

2.     For specific existing problems on ergonomics, we should demand better working conditions that will minimize the strenuous conditions in those work areas.[60]

 

 


 

Worker power in Trans National Corporations

1.     There is a need to break the stranglehold of TNCs over trade unions and governments. Numsa supports the merger of Global Trade Union Federations to build powerful GUFs. This restructuring should not be limited to structures but urgent steps need to be taken to re-look orientation, politics, methods of organizing at international level, approach towards TNCs, international bargaining and a host of other measures to re-build the respect and power of GUF’s.

2.     Numsa should demand the implementation of the IMF Sydney Congress resolution on sympathy strikes across borders in the same TNCs and Numsa must sponsor a similar resolution at the Cosatu Congress. The first port of call is that the ILO must recognize this right but we should demand the same in world company councils as a prerequisite to international bargaining

3.     Unions and global unions must campaign for the right of workers and trade unions to engage in socio-economic and political strikes (eg Section 77) to be enshrined in laws of different countries.

4.     Wage parity must be discussed at international level and companies pressurized to improve it in their subsidiaries.

5.     The struggle for harmonization of standards should be waged within international company councils, regional trade union bodies and within the global trade unions

6.     Numsa should lobby the global trade unions to call for a global strike against the WTO for its failure to agree to inclusion of labour standards into trade agreements[61]

7.     All shop stewards from TNC companies must interact with each other on exchange programmes. Shop Stewards should bargain for access to internet, emails, video phones to network and communication with their counterpart in subsidiaries and suppliers. Reports of important developments should be shared with the union[62].

8.     The union must assist shop stewards from small multi-national companies to establish company networks and attend multi-national shop steward councils that must be established with our sister unions.  Currently only the big auto companies participate.

9.     The union must make study grants available to shop stewards and ordinary members to study part time in order to capacitate them to deal with globalization.[63]

 

Guidelines for foreign company takeovers

1.     The union should develop guidelines for negotiating with foreign and local companies when they are discussing buy-outs of local companies.

2.     Those conditions should include maintenance or increasing employment level, building the skill levels of workers, investing in labour absorption capacities within these plans.

3.     In strategic companies like Denel, foreign investors should not own more than 50%[64].

 


 

Dealing with member Indebtedness

1.     Research to be conducted by the Investment Company to see how best it can assist our members with the indebtedness to the loan sharks, e.g. look into the possibility of the Credit Unions etc.

2.     Consistent with the above, we need to motivate and try to educate our members on how to manage their finances, “buy what you need, not what you want”[65].

 

 

 

 

 


 

Numsa Campaigns

 

General campaign guidelines

1.     Campaigns must be used in the context of educating our members because they revive members.

2.     Campaigns should focus on those areas that the Union has already adopted as well as pick on the gains that we have made in labour legislation.

3.     Numsa must play a strategic role within Cosatu when it comes to campaigns.

4.     Evaluation should take place after every campaign.

5.     Numsa should make use of unemployed comrades to participate in campaigns[66].

 

Pick up the Gains Campaign

1.     The Central Committee of Cosatu has adopted the ‘Pick up the Gains’ Campaign that is aimed at enhancing workers rights and defending the gains made. These issues should remain on top of our agenda as an organisation[67].

 

W. Cape Special Project

1.     Western Cape should be treated as a special project in relation to political education and political work to defeat the advances made by the DA. In this regard Cosatu and SACP in the Western Cape should be pulled together to advance the political work to build a strong ANC is desperately required in the Western Cape. It is not in the interest of the working class that its formations are divided. Attention must also be given to North West and the Eastern Cape[68].

2.     This must include assistance in terms of how the ANC should play the role of an aggressive opposition. The NEC noted that there is a danger in the province of putting up independents from amongst comrades in the ANC. The Numsa Western Cape ROB should develop a program to suggest how we move forward to prepare for the 2011 local government elections given the material conditions in the province. The NOB must develop a political POA for the province with a budget.

3.     We must have an inter-related approach that combines the national, class and gender question because unless we are able to connect the national, class and gender question we are bound to make mistakes in our tactics and strategies.

4.     We are guided by a 2004 National Congress resolution on organizing the White, Indian and Coloured working class and we must therefore shape our strategies and tactics accordingly. This resolution was taken on the basis that only WC and KZN were not ruled by the ANC. The results of the last national elections tell us that COPE made serious inroads in the Northern Cape and Nelson Mandela Metro. Coloured communities there did not vote with us so we must extend our political and research work beyond the Western Cape into those areas.

5.     We must re-circulate the outcome of the Western Cape Non Racial Conference so that comrades can see what areas the conference identified and how the conference articulated the need for cohesion and solidarity amongst the African and Coloured working class in the Western Cape.

6.     The NOB must ensure that those Numsa Western Cape Non Racial Conference resolutions are translated into a clear programme of action and that we put up the necessary resources to ensure that these are carried out.

7.     As part of making an assessment of the issues in Western Cape we must draw lessons from UDF on how it was able to conscientise, mobilize and organise working class communities in the Western Cape across all divides.

8.     Numsa in the Western Cape must through Cosatu:

8.1.  champion a Cosatu-driven programme of swelling the ranks

8.2.  work hard for the establishment of a provincial alliance political council so that we can advance an Alliance Program of Action which places the working class at the centre of service delivery and jointly agree on deployment of cadres.

8.3.  ensure that a Western Cape provincial service delivery conference is organised

9.     We must complete the research in finalizing the voting patterns of 2009 so that we may have a clearer sense (getting documents from ANC and distributing them). In doing this research we must accept that the unresolved national question is not just confined to the Western Cape.

10.  The Central Committee noted that Zille is currently talking to shopstewards in our companies in the Western Cape. Part of our work in the Western Cape must be a clear ideological onslaught against DA[69]

 

Campaign on Executive Pay

 

1.     Cosatu must campaign for legislative capping of executive pay and propose other alternatives caused by huge inequalities in executive pay.

 

Labour Law Campaign

1.     The Union through COSATU must mount a campaign to enforce the labour laws by speeding up individual worker cases so that they don’t wait more than 2 years to be heard in the Labour Court[70].


 

Campaigns, Protests and Civil Society

 

UDF

1.     The UDF was formed to achieve certain political goals in a period when the ANC could not play its full political role.

2.     The ANC is now in a position to take its rightful place in political activity,

3.     Numsa, therefore, resolves that the UDF should phase out thereby bringing to an end the Cosatu/UDF alliance and the MDM[71].

 

MDM

1.     We must consult with Cosatu and the democratic movement at large with a view to developing new tactics to rebuild the mass democratic movement in the community by:

1.1.  Rebuilding the structures of the mass democratic movement from federalism to centralism: every street shall have a street committee democratically elected; every area, an area committee; every town a local general council; every region a regional committee of elected representatives from all towns. The national democratic movement shall be built from elected representatives of the regional committees.

1.2.  Cosatu with our allies initiating and leading the transformation and rebuilding of the structures of the Mass Democratic Movement on this basis.

1.3.  The trade union movement retaining its independence and structures.

1.4.  Cosatu employing full-time project organizers to facilitate the rebuilding of structures.

2.     Cosatu should then forge a disciplined alliance with these democratic community structures at local, regional and national levels.

3.     In rebuilding local, regional and national structures, Cosatu and the democratic movement should use local and regional issues. The struggle and activities around local and regional and national issues should form the priority in rebuilding the democratic movement.

4.     The centralized Mass Democratic Movement shall be free to form sub-structures of youth or women at all levels as the need arises.

5.     At local and regional levels, the democratic organizations of the working class shall be free to form tactical alliances with anti-apartheid organizations of other sectors of the community, such as taxi-owners and traders. These alliances should be ad hoc alliances depending on local conditions.

6.     Cosatu with its allies should be the driving force for the transformation and rebuilding of the Mass Democratic Movement. The structures of the movement should be open to any oppressed and exploited resident who is elected to a street committee, irrespective of political persuasion, ideology or affiliation[72].

 

Ceasefire Campaign

1.     Although we participated in the workshops which were called in the past, we should not be part of the ceasefire campaign for demilitarisation as this will lead to a dis-service to our members in Denel[73].

 


 

Service Delivery Protests

1.     The Alliance needs to go back to communities on service delivery issues and use this as a platform to set up organisational structures of the alliance in preparation for 2011. It cannot be that it should only be the ANC that intervenes in these protests. The whole alliance must intervene in service delivery protests.

2.     Numsa condemns the violent nature of the protests[74].

 

 


 

Companies

 

Eskom

 

Organising

1.     The meeting discussed at length the question of.

2.     Eskom workers themselves should decide whether Numsa should relinquish its members in Eskom and hand them to the NUM and thereafter cease organising in Eskom. A meeting between NUM and Numsa at national level should be arranged to discuss this matter. Thereafter regional meetings can be arranged[75].

3.     Numsa to negotiate a minimum service agreement through the Department of Labour to give workers power to strike in Eskom[76].

 

Privatisation

1.     Numsa rejects any form of privatisation of the energy sector. Our proposal instead must be to assemble a team of experts to investigate: 

1.1.  the cost-drivers that make the Eskom not viable

1.2.  the forces behind the huge tariff hikes demanded by Eskom

1.3.  the procurement practices and the role of consultants in driving Eskom’s costs

1.4.  the technical capacity of Eskom to manage mega-projects

1.5.  the capacity of Eskom management to pull together a turnaround strategy for such a national asset

1.6.  the extent to which the pricing of electricity promotes priority sectors

1.7.  rejection of the $4 billion World Bank loan, with all that it implies for privatization and higher consumer tariffs hitting the poor hardest, and instead source local savings where grid expansion is required

2.     In the absence of such a comprehensive investigation, it is premature for government to suggest a role for the private sector’s profit motive to build capacity for energy supply[77].

 

Richards Bay Minerals

1.     In the jurisdictional dispute between Numsa and NUM at RBM, the majority of workers are employed in the smelting section, which falls within Numsa's constitutional scope.

2.     Numsa will not force its members to resign from the union, whether this be at RBM, Eskom or any other plant. Workers have the full right to decide to which union they wish to belong.

3.     Similarly, Numsa will not attempt to organise workers who already belong to NUM[78].

 

Denel

1.     In line with the May 2008 alliance summit resolutions, we must review all the outsourced parts of production at Denel so that we insource them back into Denel[79].

 

 

 

Working Class and Trade Union Unity

 

Working Class Unity

1.     The organized section of the working class, and Cosatu in particular, should take the lead to unite the working class.

2.     There must be immediate joint shop steward and general meetings at factory, local, regional and national levels between members of the independent unions[80].

3.     Cosatu should recommit itself to the objective of uniting organised labour and establishing one trade union federation in South Africa.

4.     Cosatu should deepen the emerging co-operation and call on the federations not to confine their co-operation to NEDLAC, but to strive for a situation where joint work will be extended to inter-affiliate activity and regional co-operation around campaigns such as wage struggles.

5.     As a way of consolidating emerging co-operation and as a stepping stone to realising our objective of one-country, one-federation, Cosatu should initiate talks with NACTU and FEDSAL, with the aim of establishing a loose confederation of trade unions (CONFTU).

6.     When negotiating with other federations on the formation of a confederation, Cosatu’s mandate will be:

6.1.  to establish a loose confederation

6.2.  that while bringing together Cosatu, NACTU and FEDSAL, the confederation will not take away the autonomy/independence of affiliated federations.

6.3.  that such a confederation should be structured at national, inter-affiliate, regional, local levels, joint shopstewards levels.

6.4.  that one of the ways in which the confederation will work will be through annual worker summits at the beginning of each year.

6.5.  that the aim of these will be to work out an annual agenda for labour[81].

 

Metalworkers’ Unity

1.     Once Numsa has official membership of those Councils, MAWU must be finally wound up[82].

2.     Numsa supports fully the objective of establishing one metalworkers union in South Africa[83],

3.     Numsa agrees that EAWUSA be transferred to Numsa[84].

4.     IMF must urge all those unions affiliated to it in SA to merge in the next 12 months.

5.     As a stepping stone to unification of all metalworkers unions, that we as Numsa should before the 1997 round of negotiations, initiate a National Co-ordinating Council of all Metalworkers Unions who are part of NICISEMI and NICMI separately.

6.     The aim of this National Co-ordinating Council will be to:-

6.1.  foster greater co-operation amongst metalworkers

6.2.  identify areas of common interest

6.3.  explore common demands and areas of joint action

6.4.  present a united front against the bosses

6.5.  adopt joint-positions in negotiations with employers.

7.     Unlike before, the Co-ordinating Council will have as its arms, regional structures that will ensure that co-operation is not confined only to the national level.

8.     As a guideline,  our members and shopsteward structures both in engineering and other sectors, may adopt the following approach in multi-union plants:

8.1.  joint-approaches when dealing with management;

8.2.  shopfloor joint-union co-ordinating committees in proportion to the strength of the different unions;

8.3.  joint-general meetings without taking away the right of each union to have its own meetings[85].

9.     Numsa should initiate talks with metal unions or other metal workers who do not belong to unions at factory, Local, Regional and National levels. [86]

10.  Before this happens, we should hold a national meeting within a reasonable time to emerge with a programme that will guide our engagements[87].

 

Workers Charter

1.     We support the Cosatu proposal that Cosatu Congress should adopt a Draft Workers' Charter which could be tabled at a broader conference of all labour organisations for final adoption[88].

2.     In regard to the Workers Charter

2.1.  A Workers' Summit must adopt the Workers Charter. This has not happened.

2.2.  Therefore, a Workers' Summit should be called prior to the Constituent Assembly to adopt the Workers' Charter aimed at uniting all workers interested.

2.3.  Workers' Rights must be entrenched in the Constitution[89].

 

Numsa Affiliation

1.     The union should apply and affiliate to the Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu)[90]

 

Cosatu

1.     Cosatu leadership programmes should be developed and leadership of various affiliates be made to interact and debate issues in order to develop a common understanding and a common perspective when approaching issues that confront workers as a whole[91].

2.     Cosatu and its Allies to intervene and develop a campaign programme on the key issues facing the working class presently i.e:

2.1.  privatization and commercialisation

2.2.  economic restructuring

2.3.  retrenchment

2.4.  lack of basic skills

3.     This intervention is a short term strategy that must be linked to our long-term goal of a democratically planned socialist economy[92].

4.     NUMSA NOB in the Cosatu CEC must sharply raise the importance of education regarding organisational programs of the federation.

5.     The affiliates must take it upon themselves to educate members about organisational programs of the federation to assist our federation

6.     All provincial organisers of the federation should not sit in the office as they often do, but should be out in the field providing support to COSATU locals in the execution of the 2015 plan.

7.     CEC members must be deployed to locals to monitor progress, provide guidance and take the mandate from members. By doing so, the industrial proletariat will take responsibility and leadership for COSATU.

8.     We must call a summit to assess the implementation of the 2015 plan because it is not on track. This must be done from local level right up to national level and from one trade union to another and then to Cosatu.[93]


 

 

 

Index


A

Adult education............................................................. 15, 17

Agency shop................................................................... 11, 26

Alliances

Tactical............................................................................... 32

The Alliance....................................................................... 33

UDF............................................................................. 31, 32

ANC

Youth League.................................................................... 27

B

Bargaining Councils.............................................. 6, 8, 21, 22

Bargaining strategy............................................. 6, 10, 11, 19

C

Campaigns

Ceasefire............................................................................ 32

Ceasefire campaign............................................................... 32

Childcare................................................................................. 14

Civil society............................................................................ 32

Company level bargaining................................................... 10

Company relocation allowance.......................................... 19

Competitiveness and new management techniques..... 18

Constituent assembly.......................................................... 36

COPE........................................................................................ 30

COSAS...................................................................................... 27

D

Denel......................................................................... 28, 32, 34

Deregulation.......................................................................... 22

E

Ear to the Ground Campaign.............................................. 23

EAWUSA.................................................................................. 35

Economic restructuring....................................................... 36

Education and training............................ 11, 15, 16, 17, 19

Elections

Local government............................................................ 30

Parliamentary................................................................... 30

Electrical and Allied Workers Union of South Africa..... 35

Employment Equity

Employment Equity Act........................................... 15, 16

Energy...................................................................................... 34

Eskom...................................................................................... 34

Exemption.............................................................................. 22

F

Federations..................................................................... 28, 35

G

Gender

Maternity leave................................................................ 14

Wages......................................................................... 13, 28

Grading..................................................................... 10, 15, 16

H

Health and Safety........................................................... 10, 27

Housing.................................................................................. 20

I

Industrial Councils.................................................... 6, 21, 22

Motor................................................................................ 35

Inflation.................................................................................. 12

Insolvency Act....................................................................... 26

International financial crisis............................................... 15

J

Jobs......................................................................................... 12

L

Labour brokers...................................................................... 16

Labour market................................................................ 14, 27

Land, housing and shelter.................................................. 20

Last in first out...................................................................... 14

LIFO.......................................................................................... 14

Literacy.................................................................................... 17

Living Wage............................................................................ 12

M

Mass Democratic Movement............................................. 32

MAWU.................................................................................... 35

Metal and Allied Workers Union....................................... 35

N

National Union of Mineworkers........................................ 34

NEDLAC................................................................................... 35

NICMI...................................................................................... 35

NUM........................................................................................ 34

Numsa

Campaigns

Ear to the Ground...................................................... 23

Collective Bargaining

House agreements....................................................... 8

Recognition Agreements.......................................... 13

Three-year bargaining strategy......................... 10, 12

Departments and Desks

Youth desk.................................................................. 27

Full-time shop stewards................................................ 25

Gender

Childcare...................................................................... 14

Childcare leave............................................................ 14

Coordination.............................................................. 14

Office Bearers................................................................... 19

RDGs.................................................................................. 20

Sectors

Engineering

Collective bargaining............................................ 11

Jewellery......................................................................... 8

Motor...................................................................... 9, 26

Plastics........................................................................... 8

Tyre and Rubber........................................................... 8

Shop stewards

Full time....................................................................... 25

Training........................................................................ 19

Structures

Locals........................................................................... 24

O

Outsourcing........................................................................... 34

P

Paternity leave....................................................................... 14

Pension and Provident Funds.................................... 15, 20

Privatisation.................................................................... 34, 36

Procurement.......................................................................... 34

Productivity...................................................... 10, 14, 16, 18

R

Recognition Agreements..................................................... 13

Recognition of Prior Learning........................................... 17

Retrenchment..................................... 12, 14, 15, 16, 20, 36

Richards Bay Minerals......................................................... 34

Right to strike........................................................................ 13

S

SACP........................................................................................ 30

Service delivery.................................................... 6, 25, 31, 33

Service delivery protests...................................................... 33

Sexual harassment................................................................ 13

Shop steward training.......................................................... 19

Short time............................................................................... 15

Skills development............................................. 6, 15, 16, 17

Skills Development Act................................................... 16

SMMEs.................................................................................... 22

South African Communist Party........................................ 30

Strike procedure.................................................................... 11

Supplier Parks........................................................................ 26

T

Tariffs...................................................................................... 34

Technology............................................................................. 18

Three-year bargaining strategy.................................... 10, 12

Time off............................................................................ 17, 19

Trade union unity................................................................. 35

Trade unions................................................ 7, 15, 28, 35, 36

Transnational Corporations........................................... 7, 28

U

United Democratic Front............................................. 31, 32

W

Work organisation......................................................... 12, 17

Workers Charter.................................................................... 36

Workplace forums................................................................ 19

Workplace restructuring..................................................... 17

World Bank............................................................................ 34

World trade organisation............................................. 10, 28

WTO.................................................................................. 10, 28


 

 



[1] CC July 2010

[2] CC 18-19 February 1989

[3] CC 21-22 May 1988

[4] NEC 22 September 1990

[5] NEC 22 September 1990

[6] NEC April 1993

[7] NEC 24-25 April 1993

[8] Mini NC 2009

[9] NC 2012

[10] CC 2-3 March 1991

[11] NEC 18-19 Feb 2000

[12] NEC April 2000

[13] NEC April 2000

[14] CC February 1989

[15] NC 1993

[16] NC 1987

[17] NEC November 2008

[18] CC Aug 2011

[19] CC Aug 2011

[20] CC 12-14 March 1993

[21] NC 1987

[22] CC 2-3 March 1991

[23] NC 1993

[24] CC 2-3 March 1991

[25] NEC November 2008

[26] NC 2012

[27] NC  2000

[28] NC 2012

[29] NC 2000

[30] NC 1996

[31] NC 1996

[32] CC March 1996

[33] NC July 1993

[34] NC 2000

[35] CC July 1989

[36] CC 2-3 March 1991

[37] NC 1987

[38] NC 2004

[39] Mini NC 2009

[40] NC 1987

[41] NC 1989

[42] NC 2000

[43] NEC Oct 2011

[44] NC 2004

[45] Mini NC 2005

[46] Mini NC 2009

[47] NC 2004

[48] NC 2012

[49] NC 2012

[50] NC 2000

[51] NC 2012

[52] NEC Feb 2012

[53] NC 2000

[54] NC 1989

[55] Mini NC 2009

[56] NC  2000

[57] Mini NC 2009

[58] NC 2008

[59] NEC 17-18 Feb 2011

[60] NC 2012

[61] Mini NC 2009

[62] Mini NC 2009

[63] NC 2012

[64] Mini NC 2009

[65] NC- 2000

[66] Mini NC 2009

[67] Mini NC 2005

[68] NEC February 2010

[69] CC July 2010

[70] NC 2012

[71] CC May 1989

[72] NC 1989

[73] NEC October 2000

[74] CC December 2009

[75] CC 20-21 Feb 1988

[76] NC 2004

[77] NEC 16 - 17 Feb 2010

[78] CC 21-22 May 1988

[79] Mini NC 2009

[80] NC 1989

[81] NC 1996

[82] NC 1987

[83] NEC November 1988

[84] NEC February 1992

[85] NC 1996

[86] NC 2004

[87] NC 2004

[88] CC 2 - 3 March 1991

[89] NC 1993

[90] NC 1987

[91] NC 1993

[92] NC 1991

[93] NC 2012